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TOPIC: Does criminal record block acceptance to Medical School?

Does criminal record block acceptance to Medical School? 5 years 3 weeks ago #7823

  • christinlain
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What is included in background check for medical school? Will a criminal record prevent acceptance by the medical school? What can I do about my criminal record? I have a DUI conviction.

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Does criminal record block acceptance to Medical School? 5 years 3 weeks ago #7824

  • dessiefrancois
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Background checks for Medical School usually include:
1. Criminal history from your State and the FBI.
2. Military Verification and Discharge Status
3. State/federal program exclusion (OIG)
4. Terrorist watch list
5. Sex offender Data Bases
6. International Searches (as applicable)
7. Social Security number verification
8. Address verification

Credit checks are usually not included in school background checks.

The background check reported to Georgetown University will include information about all convictions and convinction-equivalent adjudications for both felonies and misdemeanors. Additionally, it will include military service and discharge information for those who have served in the military.

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Last edit: by dessiefrancois.

Does criminal record block acceptance to Medical School? 5 years 3 weeks ago #7825

  • RobertMi
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Almost all medical schools ask applicants for disclosure of previous convictions. Sometimes schools ask only about felonies, but many schools want to know every conviction, and even traffic and driving convictions. The AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) uses a national service runs background checks for participating schools. However, several medical schools will run additional checks.

Criminal records affect medical school applicants as follows:

Criminal Convictions are one of various factors that are background checked. When a charge is dismissed, then it is not a conviction. However, a no contest plea can result in a conviction. Any criminal charge that is filed by government entity may still show up on a background check, even if the charge was dropped or dismissed. Many people who have been arrested were also fingerprinted at the time, and those fingerprints can show up in the national database which is checked by medical schools.

Nature of the crime: Admission Committees are hesitant to accept students who may be rejected by state licensing boards. Admission Committees will review convictions for crimes that cast doubts on student's qualifications to practice medicine.
Admissions committees are often concerned by crimes involving dishonesty (like theft and fraud) or put patients at risk, including crimes related to drugs, sex, or violence. Committees try to anticipate if the crime can indicate future behavior and how the crime will be perceived by patients and the public. Some traffic crimes are considered by the Committees because a crime like DUI can indicate problems for the future practice of medicine.

Students with criminal records should remember two important things during their application process.

Full Disclosure is the best policy: Failure to disclose your full criminal record could cause a medical school to rescind your acceptance. If the omission is discovered later, you can be dismissed from medical school, not only for the original crime, but because a cover up is dishonest. If you are uncertain about what will show up on a background check, then get a copy of your own police record, and get advice about questionable items, including misdemeanors and military discharge history.

Circumstances and Mitigating factors: Admission Committees take the circumstances of a crime and try to put it into context. Committees look favorable on rehabilitation efforts. It is best to show that the applicants has put some thought into the incident, explained the mitigating circumstances, and made changes to prevent repetition of the problem.

It is important to explain circumstances which can show that the incident was an isolated problem, which is unlikely to be repeated. For example, if the family suffered an untimely death or other catastrophe resulting in temporary stress and instability. Documentation of rehabilitation treatment or volunteer work is usually helpful. .

It is difficult enough to apply to medical school and gain acceptance. A criminal record complicates the process, so the best policy is honesty. If you explain what happened, then you can put the best light on it. Explain what you learned from the incident, and what changes you have made to prevent repetition of the problem that led to the crime.

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Last edit: by RobertMi.
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