Introduction
The Fund had been a major funding source for victim services since its establishment in 1984

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ovc/publications/factshts/vocacvf/welcome.html

How Are Fund Deposits Disbursed?
Money is allocated among various government agencies for child abuse investigation and prosecution, the federal criminal justice system, an emergency reserve to assist victims of terrorism, and other state assistance programs.

Victim Compensation
Direct reimbursements are made to or on behalf of crime victims for crime-related expenses.

Victim Assistance
Awards are made by states to organizations that provide services such as crisis intervention, emergency shelter and transportation, and criminal justice advocacy to victims of crime.

Discretionary Funds
Awards are used to fund training and technical assistance and demonstration initiatives.

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TTY: 1-866-682-8880

 

 

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The Crime Victims Fund (the Fund), established by the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (VOCA), is a major funding source for victim services throughout the Nation. Millions of dollars have been deposited into the Fund annually from criminal fines, forfeited bail bonds, penalties, and special assessments collected by U.S. Attorneys' Offices, federal U.S. courts, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons. To date, Fund dollars have always come from offenders convicted of federal crimes, not from taxpayers. Previous legislation expanded the sources from which Fund deposits may come. Passed in October 2001, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act (USA PATRIOT Act) provided authority for the deposit of gifts, bequests, or donations from private entities into the Fund beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2002.

When the Fund was authorized in 1984, a cap was placed on how much could be deposited into it for the first 8 years. The amount of money deposited into the Fund has fluctuated from year to year. The table below depicts the amount of money deposited into the Fund each fiscal year from 1985 through 2005.1 Lifting of the cap in 1993 allowed for the deposit of all criminal fines, forfeited bail bonds, penalties, and special assessments authorized by VOCA to support crime victim program activities. In FY 2000, Congress reinstated the cap on the Fund. Under this scheme, the actual amount of funding available for programs authorized by VOCA is determined each year during the appropriations process.

Crime Victims Fund Deposits in Millions of Dollars

Fiscal Year

Total Funds Collected

Cap on Fund

Total Funds Available

1985–1986

68.3

100

68.3

1986–1987

62.5

110

62.5

1987–1988

77.4

110

77.4

1988–1989

93.6

110

93.6

1989–1990

133.5

125

125

1990–1991

146.2

125

125

1991–1992

128

150

128

1992–1993

221.6

150

150

1993–1994

144.7

0

144.7

1994–1995

185.1

0

185.1

1995–1996

233.9

0

233.9

1996–1997

528.9

0

528.9

1997–1998

362.9

0

362.9

1998–1999

324

0

324

1999–2000

985.2

500

1,023.6

2000–2001

777

537.5

1,321.2

2001–2002

544.4

550

1,334.6

2002–2003

519.5

600

1,331.8

2003–2004

361.3

621.3*

1,093.3

2004–2005

833.7

620*

1,305.1

*Denotes that fiscal year cap was reduced by congressional rescission.

 

 

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